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Gimme ten Timbits® and a large ÐÖÜߣ€ ¥®±§H?

No Sale

 

Whether karmic retribution over the minimum wage scandal, just another high-profile target chosen for its prestige or simply an opportunity to mess with a whole lot of half-awake people at the same time as they attempted to acquire their daily fix, somewhere between a hundred and a thousand Tim Hortons locations across the country were hit by a form of computer virus a couple of days ago. This one hit them right where it hurts – in the cash register. Literally.

 

According to the company, a substantial number of the chain’s Panasonic Point-Of-Sale systems were smacked with undisclosed malware, resulting in service delays and in some cases, the shutdown of entire restaurants. Sources say there was no threat to client data or other computer systems, but there are unconfirmed reports of lawsuits launched by the franchisees who argue their systems should have been better protected by the company’s IT support services.

 

Only time will reveal the amount of damage and lost productivity resulting from a major blip in the country’s primary caffeine supply chain.

 

Read more here.

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I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll shut your network down

 

Many areas of the world, including ours, have experienced extreme weather events in recent years. Natural and man-made disasters like floods, fires and earthquakes have had their way, destroying everything from beachfront property to cities and even entire countries. These threats are expanding in frequency and scope, even showing up in unexpected places, wreaking untold havoc upon the unprepared.

 

Now there is a new set of threats that are approaching in potential severity and impact.

 

According to the World Economic Forum, cyber attacks are among the most serious risks facing the world as we know it today. The ability to attack not only individuals and businesses but also government and infrastructure like power, gas and water puts these threats into the same category as hurricanes and forest fires.

 

We not only need to be aware of the immediate effects us as computer users and as business owners, we must understand how small weaknesses in our systems can play a serious role in much larger scenarios. No one wants to be hacked, but we must also be vigilant to ensure we're not leaving a door to our clients or suppliers unlocked, allowing troublemakers entrance to do their dirty deeds on a grander scale.

 

The big, bad wolf has a new kind of wind machine; bricks and mortar might not be enough to hold up this time. It's time to review, test and reinforce your defences. Let's talk.

 

http://www.zdnet.com/article/cyber-attacks-are-a-top-three-risk-to-society-alongside-natural-disaster-and-extreme-weather

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Gimme ten Timbits® and a large ÐÖÜߣ€ ¥®±§H?

No Sale

 

Whether karmic retribution over the minimum wage scandal, just another high-profile target chosen for its prestige or simply an opportunity to mess with a whole lot of half-awake people at the same time as they attempted to acquire their daily fix, somewhere between a hundred and a thousand Tim Hortons locations across the country were hit by a form of computer virus a couple of days ago. This one hit them right where it hurts – in the cash register. Literally.

 

According to the company, a substantial number of the chain’s Panasonic Point-Of-Sale systems were smacked with undisclosed malware, resulting in service delays and in some cases, the shutdown of entire restaurants. Sources say there was no threat to client data or other computer systems, but there are unconfirmed reports of lawsuits launched by the franchisees who argue their systems should have been better protected by the company’s IT support services.

 

Only time will reveal the amount of damage and lost productivity resulting from a major blip in the country’s primary caffeine supply chain.

 

Read more here.


add a comment
Subscribe to this Blog Like on Facebook Tweet this! Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn
Hardware Software Cybersecurity Malware Business Continuity IoT (Internet of Things) Cyberwar

I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll shut your network down

 

Many areas of the world, including ours, have experienced extreme weather events in recent years. Natural and man-made disasters like floods, fires and earthquakes have had their way, destroying everything from beachfront property to cities and even entire countries. These threats are expanding in frequency and scope, even showing up in unexpected places, wreaking untold havoc upon the unprepared.

 

Now there is a new set of threats that are approaching in potential severity and impact.

 

According to the World Economic Forum, cyber attacks are among the most serious risks facing the world as we know it today. The ability to attack not only individuals and businesses but also government and infrastructure like power, gas and water puts these threats into the same category as hurricanes and forest fires.

 

We not only need to be aware of the immediate effects us as computer users and as business owners, we must understand how small weaknesses in our systems can play a serious role in much larger scenarios. No one wants to be hacked, but we must also be vigilant to ensure we're not leaving a door to our clients or suppliers unlocked, allowing troublemakers entrance to do their dirty deeds on a grander scale.

 

The big, bad wolf has a new kind of wind machine; bricks and mortar might not be enough to hold up this time. It's time to review, test and reinforce your defences.

 

Let's talk.

 

Read more here.

 

 

 


add a comment
Subscribe to this Blog Like on Facebook Tweet this! Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn
Business Continuity Infrastructure IoT (Internet of Things) Cyberwar